Happy Feather’s Day!

Esther BeatonAustralia - People and Places, Bird Images, Did You Know?, New South Wales, WildlifeLeave a Comment

Male emu with eggs

Here’s something to make all fathers think. Be thankful you weren’t born an emu. Your lot in life would have been tending all the eggs – a dozen or more at a time (some even fertilised by rival males!) – no time to lubricate your parched throat and you would suffer dramatic weight loss. And it doesn’t stop there – you’d be tending … Read More

A Powerful Story (or The One That Got Away)

Esther BeatonDid You Know?, WildlifeLeave a Comment

Powerful Owl

As a nature and wildlife photographer I’m outdoors a lot and I often get into scrapes. They make entertaining stories to share on blogs and elsewhere. One time, however, it was my photographic subject that got into one – or almost. I was walking home one cool August night, in the quiet seaside village of Pearl Beach where I used … Read More

Orchid Fly – New to Science?

Esther BeatonDid You Know?, Macro PhotographyLeave a Comment

I ran into some orchid hunters on the weekend and instead of doing what I was “supposed” to do, I played hooky and went out into the fields to play with my new friends. It was well worth the effort (fun?) because we may have stumbled on to something new to science. Orchids are some of the most mysterious and … Read More

Is this the Most Important Forest in the World?

Esther BeatonDid You Know?, Ecology, Victoria1 Comment

A recent media release announced that scientists had measured the most carbon dense forest in the world. No, it’s not in the Amazon – it’s right here in Australia and I know it intimately. I worked hand in hand, for over a year, with well-known ecologist David Lindenmayer, one of the team of scientists who made the discovery. (He’s the … Read More

The Spider Olympics

Esther BeatonDid You Know?6 Comments

This little feller wasn’t invited to compete in the high-wire gymnastics at the Olympics – probably due to unfair advantage. His type was born with extraordinary skills and an especially strong dose of pluck and courage built right in to his DNA. The female St Andrews Cross Spider, common in gardens, is a model of sexual cannibalism. Tiny, almost invisible … Read More